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No Ape-Man Consciousness HERE, Pilgrim!

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen 

Do you ever think about thinking? Although it seems like an odd notion, that kind of woolgathering can be oddly pleasurable. Out on the highway, traffic on my right was going to merge. In the interests of safety and courtesy, I was going to move into the left lane. Nope, occupied. So I slowed down and let the other car merge that way. Those thoughts took about a second.

We have thoughts and make choices. Consciousness sets us apart from the apes, and the evolutionists who search for consciousness have a new problem.

My wife and I were on our way to the Ashokan Reservoir. This was partly to get some miles on the car because it needed a boost (jump start), and to just give ourselves an outing before the main heat of the day set in. Nice day for it, and I like seeing our part of the Catskill Mountains and the reservoir.

It has been a busy day for cognating. After a fitful night because I could not get comfortable and my mind still wanted to work, I got into the shower. Do I want the same shower gel I used last time or that one that is supposed to smell like ocean mist? I took the same as before, it has a nice, clean smell also.

Oh, goodie! My wife made up whaddya call it... flapjacks, hotcakes, pancakes... those things. I keep forgetting that we have maple syrup, so we used the other stuff in the plastic bottle. I won't tell you what kind because I don't want anyone smashing windows and setting the dumpster on fire.

There are viruses known as bacteriophages. Probably because they phage bacteria or something. Is there a connection with the generic form of Glucophage that I take?

I'll never forget our dear, departed Basement Cat. It was time to do my Bible reading (this month, it's the NASB), and looked at the dining room table. She was often sleeping there and would come over and join me on the couch for Purr Meeting and the Blessing of the Cat. Good memories, but also sad.

Not all of these things happened on the same day or in any sequence. It was a sort of composite, I suppose. However, this shows that people have consciousness. We make choices that can be impulsive and based on preference, or we can weigh the options. Apes don't so such things with any great detail or thought. I seriously doubt that critters think about thinking, either.

The Bible is comprised of sixty six books by authors ranging from kings to farmers and written in several languages. Scholars translate these into our languages. The use of language, including written and oral forms, are structured and have various rules. Translating ancient languages into what we speak now is a daunting task, and the experts must choose between formal equivalence and dynamic (or functional) equivalence; to have a strictly literal version is essentially unreadable because of language structures. Apes don't learn languages, write texts, or translate them. Nor do they compose operas and set words to music. This requires a level of consciousness that is absent from them.

Our Creator gave us consciousness because we are created in God's image. Critters are not. If anyone cares to give it some thought, the differences between us are multitudinous. While naturalists deny the existence of the soul, they still search for it because evolution. In a similar manner, they have searched for consciousness. Darwin's disciples cannot explain consciousness. It was thought to be in the brain, but new research not only devastates the "brain in a vat" philosophy, but further affirms special creation — whether evolutionists like it or not.
Evolutionists have always had a major problem explaining the origin and evolution of human consciousness. As Professor Yoram Gutfreund of the Department of Neurobiology at the Rappaport Research Institute in Israel explains, the “major mind-evolution problem is the difficulty of fitting consciousness in an evolutionary framework…. Scientific agreement is that consciousness arises from the brain’s activity, however, there is no understanding as to how.” As one evolutionist proclaims,
Now you can make a conscious choice. I hope you will choose to finish reading the article excerpted just above. To do so, click on "Human Consciousness Just Became a Bigger Challenge to Darwin".


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