Sunday, April 16, 2017

Of Primary Importance

There are many denominations, doctrines, dogmas, opinions, notions, and more under the broad heading of Christianity. Some believe that baptism by sprinkling is okay, others insist on full immersion (and a few hold to the false doctrine of baptismal regeneration). Do we baptise infants or only adults? There are some heterodox beliefs that are mixed in as well.

The Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus heart of gospel
Credit: Cadetgray / Wikimedia Commons
(CC BY-SA 3.0)
There are people who claim that creation is an unimportant side issue, but that is not the case. While belief in biblical creation is not a requirement for salvation, it is important because all major Christian doctrines have their foundations in Genesis.

The apostle Paul referred to creation and Genesis many times. Of interest here is when he referred to Adam and to Jesus as "the last Adam" (1 Cor. 15:22, 45). Nevertheless, Paul went to the most important point of all: the Crucifixion and bodily Resurrection of Jesus. They are of first importance, the heart of the gospel, and should be the unifying factor above all other beliefs, interpretations, and opinions.
The Christian faith is not a mere collection of doctrines — a bag of truths. Christianity is a comprehensive truth claim that encompasses every aspect of revealed doctrine, but is centered in the gospel of Jesus Christ. And, as the apostolic preaching makes clear, the gospel is the priority.

The Apostle Paul affirms this priority when he writes to the Christians in Corinth. In the opening verses of 1 Corinthians 15, Paul sets out his case:
To finish reading (it's not very long), click on "Of First Importance: The Priority of the Cross and the Empty Tomb".


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Graven Images of Jesus?

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Something that puts a burr under my saddle is when people who have limited knowledge of what the Bible actually teaches will try to use it against Christians. Early on, I had a picture of Jesus that appeared on each post on a certain weblog. Someone was on the prod because I said something against one of his pet heterodox doctrines, so he threw down on me in the comments and added that because I had that picture, it was a graven image and I was an idolator. That'll be the day!




We expect that kind of nonsense from atheopaths, but it's distressing when it comes from professing Christians who are ignorant of the Bible that they claim to believe. These are the same jaspers who falsely claim that Jeremiah 10:1-5 (written hundreds of years before Christ) means we cannot have Christmas trees in our homes. (Hint: try reading Scripture for understanding, pilgrim.) If images of Jesus are idols, it would mean that many art masterpieces throughout the centuries are wicked. Yes, we know that nobody knew what Jesus really looked like, but there's actually nothing wrong with graphic representations of him.

When I was a child, I thought the second commandment meant that you should not make any image of God whatsoever. Being about seven years old, I was unaware of the work of William Blake, Michelangelo, and others, and was unwilling to draw a picture of God in Sunday School. Simply stated, a graven image is a substitute god that people worship.

I'll go you one further. It is not wrong to have an image of Jesus, and I reckon it's all right to use it as a focal point during prayer. This can be a mite tricky, though, if you tend to be praying to the image and not God the Son. Keep your perspective. And no, praying to statues and pictures of saints, or praying to them in other ways, is prohibited by Scripture. Mary was a blessed woman, and many of the others who are called saints were probably fine folks, but they cannot hear you, and would object to being given prayers.

For more about pictures and such, I suggest reading "What Is a Graven Image?"

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Secular Science Lingo and Question Evolution Day

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Question Evolution Day has several purposes, not the least of which is to prompt people to take a stand for freedoms, including speech, intellectual, and academic. Further, we hope to encourage people to examine what they've been taught about minerals-to-microbiologist evolution. They are likely to see that evolutionary dogma is saturated with opinions stated as scientific facts and just-so stories, but very little actual evidence.


Question Evolution Day should prompt people to think. Word definitions make things more confusing, especially when secular science uses buzzwords and propaganda.
Image furnished by Why?Outreach incorporating some graphics by R. Bennett
Darwin's Cheerleaders™ often use propaganda tricks with word definitions, especially conflating evolution with science (such as saying that biblical creationists "hate science" because we deny common ancestor evolution). The reality is that many creationist scientists are fully credentialed, appreciating science and working in their fields. Another conflation is conflating any sort of change with Darwin's concepts and calling it evolution. Not true.

Worse, evolutionary scientists and their sycophantic press are often unsure of their own definitions — especially of new words and phrases. We need to be on the alert for buzzwords that seem innocuous, but are actually concepts that are sinister and agenda-driven.
Big Science doesn’t have a public relations problem. It has a propaganda problem.

To hear science journal editors and science news reporters, you would think the gods are angry at stupid people. For example, on Live Science, Stephanie Pappas purports to explain “Why Americans Deny Science,” taking hold of the Yoda microphone to berate the unwashed masses. It’s not that the issues of “evolution, climate and vaccines” do not deserve informed discussion, or whether a fraction of the populace believes dumb things. It’s that her elitist stance begins and ends with the attitude, “We’re right, they’re wrong, that’s the end of the story”. . .
The U.S. has a science problem. Around half of the country’s citizens reject the facts of evolution; fewer than a third agree there is a scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, and the number who accept the importance of vaccines is ticking downward.
But there are reasons to doubt the “scientific consensus.” Who says so? Members of the scientific consensus itself, that’s who. Consider these recent reports from the journals and mainstream media.  
I'd be much obliged if you'd finish reading the article. Just click on "Language Strangles Scientific Ideals".



Sunday, January 1, 2017

Pondering My Legacy

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

We keep hearing about a "legacy" in these parts, especially when a president is ending, or has ended, a term in office. I don't rightly recollect hearing the word used until recent years, maybe with President Bill Clinton. What is a legacy? The first definition that Merriam-Webster gives involves bequeathed money or property, but that's clearly not what's being discussed. The second definition is: "something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past". That's where we want to be.


Some people seek a legacy, but most of us will be forgotten. Except when we stand before Jesus Christ, then important things will be revealed.
Image credit: Morguefile /genieslot
Nobody is going to become wealthy from my financial legacy. 

In the bigger scheme of things, a legacy would be something substantial that was left behind, hopefully to benefit subsequent generations. That's the key to this article. Perhaps when someone's name is mentioned, it brings to mind that certain beneficial something. Unfortunately, people have left legacies that are negative: Bill Clinton was (and is) a philanderer, B. Hussein Obama will be remembered by many as a divisive, abortion-promoting, race-baiting leftist who considers his activities mirific, Fidel Castro as a brutal, murderous dictator. And so on.

It's been said that in 200 years, we will all have been forgotten. While there's a wealth of information on the Web, all information about people is not, cannot, be there. There are records for statesmen, but Secretary of State Henry Clay is not exactly someone that is instantly remembered, nor members of his family. Who were the nurses at Hartford Hospital when it opened in 1854? What was the name of that girl that sat in the back of the classroom when you were eight years old? I saw a list of celebrities (entertainers and political leaders) that died in 2016, and I wasn't all that stirred up. In 2010, shortly after I recommitted my life to Christ, I found out that Dana Key had died, and I cried a river. The DeGarmo and Key band had impacted my life, and I still have fond memories.

Fame and memories are fickle. It's been said that the good things we do are written in water, but the bad things are carved in stone. There's some truth in that, as positive things about people, famous or not, are frequently overshadowed by bad things they've done.

Some people want fame on the Web, whether writing brilliant articles or being vituperative sidewinders who seek to save "science" from biblical creationists. Web fame is elusive. Some jasper called PewDiePie said he'd delete his YouTube account if he got 50 million followers, reached that mark, it's still there three weeks later. I'd never heard of him until the story made social media news. There are other ways of seeking prestige, but we have to admit that it will all be gone someday.

I'd like to be remembered in a positive way, but if I am, those memories will fade as well. I think of people in my past that I've hurt years ago and hope they've forgiven me. Perhaps some of the good things I've done will not be entirely forgotten. Even so, I want to make an impact on people here and now with the gospel and the truth of biblical creation. Perhaps we'll meet in Heaven and I'll find out that I helped someone.

In The Dark Knight, Alfred told Bruce Wayne, "Some men just want to watch the world burn". Guess what? It will happen according to God's plan (2 Peter 3:10-11). We are all going to stand before Jesus Christ, and the works of believers will be revealed by fire (1 Cor. 3:12-15, Rom. 14:10-11), and those who reject Jesus have a terrifying destiny (Rev. 20:11-15 and 21:8, Matt. 25:41-46). I'll never be important and have a legacy on Earth. Big deal. The important thing is to please God.