Monday, September 14, 2020

Misplaced Blame - Bad Science, not "Religion"

by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Misotheists are fond of blaming the Bible and Christians for what they consider "bad science" and "superstition", even though the Bible was proven right many times. For instance, someone with a contagious disease was isolated, not the entire community. George Washington bled to death because of the bad medical practice of bloodletting despite Gen. :4 and Lev. 17:14. There are other instance of bad or questionable medicine that atheists ignore in their selective citing.


Atheists excuse superstitious medical practices such as with the so-called Dancing Plague, but are quick to falsely accuse the Bible of bad teachings.
Credits: Original from Freeimages / Carol O'Driscoll, modified at PhotoFunia
A video of "paranormal" mysteries had a segment of the so-called Dancing Plague of 1518. Doing a bit of research shows that this was not an isolated incident, but there are several suggestions regarding the cause; to call it paranormal is silly. It is interesting that the diagnosis was "hot blood" and that the recommendation was that people continue to dance despite people collapsing and even dying.

For years, I have said that the Salem Witch Trials were black marks on both American history and Christianity. (Such literal witch hunts were not confined to the United States, however.) I'll allow that there was a great deal of bad religion involved and misuse of the Bible, but that does not justify a conclusion that all religion is false. Such activities are not based in Scripture or reasonable biblical teachings.

What makes the Salem situation more complicated is that the actions of so-called witnesses and victims may have had a biological basis. There is increasing evidence to consider that the ergot fungus was involved. Rye was a staple crop in that area, and ergot grew on it. People would ingest the grain and the fungus, then could have hallucinations. People with bad theology would be swept up in the hysteria and think they were doing the Lord's work.

Such forensic science is seriously limited, of course, but it does give us some things to consider. Mockers of God rush to judgement but there could be other causes. Medical superstitions that lead to death are given a pass. "Science is self-correcting!" may be claimed, but the two instances cited above had nothing whatsoever to do with science from the get-go. Such data are frequently cited by Christophobes, but like evolutionary researchers, involve incomplete research and invalid conclusions. Avoid bad teachings and lousy logic like the plague.